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Profile Streaming vs. profile size


Stanley Schwartz

Question

There used to be a "rule of thumb" where we wanted to keep the UPM_Profile directory to something less than about 20 MB.

 

My question is.....with Profile Streaming now so prominent, is that rule of thumb still a thing?

 

I ask because I've been pushing any folders that push the UPM_Profile directory over that 20 MB threshold, in to the Profile Container.  So things like Chrome, Firefox, OneNote, etc. are directed to the Profile Container.  With Profile Streaming enabled, is this necessary?

 

Thanks in advance,

S

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Hi,

 

I think it's almost impossible to have a profile size as small as 20MB. I have seen that the default profile size in WS2019 and W10 is somewhere between 75-100MB, and that JUST profile information, as soon as we have applications in the mix, the profile size will be considerably larger.

 

If you enable profile streaming, you don't have to be that concerned about the profile size. 

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52 minutes ago, Kasper Johansen1709159522 said:

Hi,

 

I think it's almost impossible to have a profile size as small as 20MB. I have seen that the default profile size in WS2019 and W10 is somewhere between 75-100MB, and that JUST profile information, as soon as we have applications in the mix, the profile size will be considerably larger.

 

If you enable profile streaming, you don't have to be that concerned about the profile size. 

Well, you're certainly not wrong! :)

 

So if there's no need to use Profile Containers for size management, why use a Profile Container if Profile Streaming is enabled?

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Profile Streaming will only help you during logon. If you have OST files or OneDrive data in the profile, it will take a very long time to log off. On top of that I am not sure how Outlook performs if the OST fil is streamed. Profile Containers are much more stable you will probably never experience a corrupt profile container as error correction is built in the SMB connection.

 

Profile Containers are the de facto standard now, there are very few use cases left where Citrix Profile Management and/or Windows Roaming profile is relevant.

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34 minutes ago, Kasper Johansen1709159522 said:

Profile Streaming will only help you during logon. If you have OST files or OneDrive data in the profile, it will take a very long time to log off. On top of that I am not sure how Outlook performs if the OST fil is streamed. Profile Containers are much more stable you will probably never experience a corrupt profile container as error correction is built in the SMB connection.

 

Profile Containers are the de facto standard now, there are very few use cases left where Citrix Profile Management and/or Windows Roaming profile is relevant.

 

Excellent!  Thanks!

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So to carry this out a little further...what happens when a profile bloats to over 1 GB?

 

Using profile streaming, all the data still has to be "copied" back to the user store.

 

Using a profile container, the data doesn't have to be "copied" anywhere, because it's being redirected, live, in to the profile container.

 

Is there no performance (either application performance or logon/logoff performance) or reliability gains to be had there?

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On 7/1/2020 at 2:03 PM, Stanley Schwartz said:

So to carry this out a little further...what happens when a profile bloats to over 1 GB?

 

Using profile streaming, all the data still has to be "copied" back to the user store.

 

Using a profile container, the data doesn't have to be "copied" anywhere, because it's being redirected, live, in to the profile container.

 

Is there no performance (either application performance or logon/logoff performance) or reliability gains to be had there?

Using profile streaming you will be able to stream a part of the user's profile, to "simulate" a faster logon. CPM usually streams the most essential part of the profile, enough to get you logged on to Windows, everything else happens in background.

You are correct. When using a profile container, data isn't copied it's created/modified/deleted in the container. If the container size reaches its defined limit (you define the limit), then the user will either not be able to logon, or the user will experience erratic behavior in Windows.

Reading through the thread again, I may need to clarify that when I talk about Profile Container, it's in the context of FSLogix, not the container feature in CPM. With that said, FSLogix uses block based connection, when mounting the profile container, CPM uses a file based connection. Block based connection are very efficient in terms of network traffic as it's only writing changes to files within the container, that's usually a much smaller footprint compared to file-based connections which usually writes the entire file back when ever there is a change.

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On 7/5/2020 at 1:57 AM, Kasper Johansen1709159522 said:

...If the container size reaches its defined limit (you define the limit), then the user will either not be able to logon, or the user will experience erratic behavior in Windows.

Reading through the thread again, I may need to clarify that when I talk about Profile Container, it's in the context of FSLogix, not the container feature in CPM. With that said, FSLogix uses block based connection, when mounting the profile container, CPM uses a file based connection. Block based connection are very efficient in terms of network traffic as it's only writing changes to files within the container, that's usually a much smaller footprint compared to file-based connections which usually writes the entire file back when ever there is a change.

 

The "define the limit" comment; I assume you were talking about FSLogix?  Because I don't see any reference to that in WEM Profile Containers.  Is there a limit to a WEM Profile Container?

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